Adapting Inventory to Spikes in Demand and Short Supply

Free Live Chat Session

Adapting Inventory to spikes in demand and short supply

How are you adapting your Lean Inventory strategies post-pandemic? With the challenges demonstrated by “just-in-time” inventory practices recently, sudden advent of unexpected peak season and the upcoming holiday season, what does an ideal inventory management strategy look like?

When: October 27, 2020
Where: Zoom
Price: Free

REGISTER HERE

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Free Webinar – Systemic Racism in Supply Chain: What Are You Doing to Bring A Change?

Live Chat Series – Systemic Racism in Supply Chain: What Are You Doing to Bring A Change?

Date:  September 29, 2020

Time: 4:30 – 6:30 pm EDT

Zoom Virtual Platform – Complimentary Webinar

Join our Panel discussion about Systemic Racism and learn how to proactively participate in supporting the movement towards equality in your workplace.

Opening Remarks:
Hugh Lawson
Director, Business Development, Canada
Staples

Moderator:
Wael Safwat
Director of Procurement, North America
Black & McDonald

Panelists:
Jason Murray
President and Managing Partner
BIPOC Executive Search

Theresa Harrison
Director, Environmental Social Governance Services, Procurement, Business Enablement
Ernst & Young LLP

Hugh Amiel
Director of Procurement
University Health Network (UHN)

Complimentary for members and non-members

Earn 2 CPD Points

Register here

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COVID Recovery and Preparing for the Fall Wave

COVID Recovery and Preparing for the Fall Wave

Date: Aug 26, 2020

Time: 4:30 PM (EDT)

Location: Zoom Virtual Platform

Supply Chain Canada, Ontario Institute and OPBA Jointly Host Their Third Learning & Networking Event (Virtually)

Stay tuned for more details.

Opening Note: Laura Cocuzzi, Manager – Procurement & Planning, Region of Peel | Board Member – Supply Chain Canada, Ontario Institute

Panel Introduction: Chris Penny, Kinetic GPO

Panel:

Umesh Kalia  – Procurement Manager, City of Vaughan
Tina Iacoe – Procurement Manager, City of Hamilton
Tracey Dennis  – Chief Procurement Officer, The Ottawa Hospital
Mai Gagujas – Procurement and Supply Chain, The Manitoba Securities Commission

Register here

Pricing

  • Member – $10
  • Non-Member – $20

Earn 2 CPD Points

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Upcoming (Virtual) Professional Development Session on Free Trade Agreements CUSMA (USMCA), CETA and TPP

Learn more about the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) which entered into force on July 1, 2020, replacing the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

Empower yourself with the current knowledge and tools when dealing with suppliers, shippers, carriers, banks, freight forwarders, customs brokers, CBSA and other Participating Government Agencies involved in your international supply chain in North America, Europe and in the Pacific region

Date & Time: August 12 and/or August 13, 2020 | 9 AM – 12 PM EST
Location: Zoom
Member Price: $595 for 2-Half Days and $395 for 1-Half day | Non-member price: $895 for 2-Half Days and $495 for 1-Half Day

Register Here for 1-Day and/or 2-Days Sessions.

 

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How to Negotiate With Your Existing Suppliers

“If you know the enemy and you know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles”

       Sun Tzu, The Art of War

 

When it comes to negotiating with a supplier you know versus a supplier you don’t, the tendency is to prefer the one you have an existing relationship with.

 

There could be several reasons as to why this would make the most sense:

 

       Renewing an agreement for goods and services that are already being provided.

       Engaging a supplier who is already on site for time-sensitive work

       Leveraging pre-negotiated terms, conditions and/or pricing

 

However, these are not the most common reasons for businesses to prefer their incumbent suppliers to new ones.

 

The main reason we negotiate with incumbents is because we know them.

 

When I needed new tires I asked my mechanic what he would recommend, since he had been servicing my car for the last 6 years. Tires were not his specialty and I knew I would pay a premium by having him find and purchase the tires for me. But I also knew that he would recommend the best tires based on his knowledge of my car and the way I drive it.

 

Similarly, we tend to prefer looking to our incumbent suppliers for solutions to our problems because we feel that they will recommend what is best for our organization based on their knowledge and experience from having worked with us.

 

This makes complete sense, and in most cases would be the recommended approach. The goal should be to have 80% (or more) of your annual spend go through your top 20 suppliers.

 

But this should not mean that we forego the negotiation. A healthy supplier relationship is built not only on trust, but also on transparency and mutual benefit. Good suppliers understand this and are willing to open up discussions for a mutually beneficial agreement. The rest are looking to make a quick buck at their customer’s expense.

 

I recently had the good fortune and misfortune of representing a client in negotiations with two very well known software suppliers. The client had acquired another company through a divestiture and both suppliers were incumbents of the divested entity.

 

One supplier came to the table in the full spirit of partnership. Their team brought forth all of the knowledge they had gleaned over the years in licensing their products to the divested entity. They understood the architecture and proposed solutions that would allow my client to maximize their investment. They also provided industry insight that demonstrated an understanding of my client’s business beyond what their software did.

 

The other supplier pointed to their existing license agreement with the divested entity and stated that, since it did not allow for assignment of licenses, my client would need to re-purchase all of the licenses that were currently installed or face legal recourse.

 

In the end, we negotiated a short-term agreement with one supplier and established a longer-term strategic partnership with the other.

 

I will let you guess which supplier my client no longer uses.

 

Leveraging existing relationships doesn’t mean giving in to the incumbent’s demands, but rather negotiating mutually beneficial agreements with the suppliers that want to be true business partners and not just vendors that sell you things.

 

Have you recently negotiated with an incumbent supplier, or are you preparing to do so anytime soon? If so, I would love to hear about any challenges you’ve had to overcome or tips you may have for the rest of us.

 

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Identifying and Managing Procurement Risks – Public and Private Sector

Identifying and Managing Procurement Risks – Public and Private Sector

Workshop Dates: July 23, 24 from 9AM – 12:30PM EST.

As a response to the COVID -19, we are conducting this professional development session online . We are fully cognizant of the difficult decisions you are making everyday, as supply chain professionals driving the Canadian economy during this extraordinary time. We applaud your commitment to continued education. 


Managing Procurement Risks

Workshop Overview: 

Procurement risks are ever increasing considering the high value, increased size, scope and volume of procurements, complexity, stringent policies, rules, regulations and trade agreements. This workshop is developed to identify potential risks and provide practical tools and strategies to mitigate those risks. 

This workshop is critical now more than ever as it is designed to address all facets of procurement risk and provides advice to identify, access, avoid, transfer and mitigate  the supply chain challenges/risks in crisis times (e.g. Global Pandemic). How an outbreak of deadly disease happening at other part of the world would impact your supply chain and how you can protect your supply chain and address supply shortages and access to critical products and services. 

Professionals involved in Supply Chain Activities make decisions and inherit a variety of risks while executing procurement projects involving a large amount of dollars. Are you aware of those risks and should you be taking those risks? And how to provide value added services to your organization by effectively mitigating procurement risks.  Procurement professionals that understand risks, consequences and mitigation strategies are the leaders for supply chain.  Procurement professionals are tasked to achieve cost-savings and conduct an open, fair and transparent procurement process. Do you realize that systematic identification and risk mitigation strategies significantly increases your chances of achieving those cost savings targets and meeting the fairness obligations?

This workshop will show you how to achieve those targets and provide you with comprehensive understanding of different types of risks at each stage of the procurement process. It will provide you with risk mitigation strategies, case studies, checklists and best practices.

Target Audience:

This workshop is designed for wide-range of professionals involved in Supply Chain Activities (procuring goods, services, construction, consulting) within the private sector and public sector organizations (Municipal, Provincial and Federal government, Universities, Hospitals, School boards, Colleges and other government agencies) where they are directly or indirectly involved in procurement activities and influencing the procurement outcome.

The professionals including Project Managers, Evaluation Team members, Logistics professionals, Category Specialist, Procurement Analyst, Procurement Managers, Business Analysts, Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), Contract Managers, HR, IT, and Finance Professionals would greatly benefit  and gain confidence from this workshop where they would understand the procurement risks and gain knowledge around the best practices for managing those risks to improve the overall bottom line of their organization.

Learn More and Register Here

Non-member Price: $1,245 + HST

(Includes membership at Supply Chain Canada, Ont. Institute)

muniSERV members receive Discount of 20% – Use Code: MUNI20

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Identifying and Managing Procurement Risks – Public and Private Sector

Identifying and Managing Procurement Risks – Public and Private Sector

Workshop Dates: July 16, 17, 23, 24 from 9AM – 12:30PM EST.

As a response to the COVID -19, we are conducting this professional development session online . We are fully cognizant of the difficult decisions you are making everyday, as supply chain professionals driving the Canadian economy during this extraordinary time. We applaud your commitment to continued education. 


Managing Procurement Risks

Workshop Overview: 

Procurement risks are ever increasing considering the high value, increased size, scope and volume of procurements, complexity, stringent policies, rules, regulations and trade agreements. This workshop is developed to identify potential risks and provide practical tools and strategies to mitigate those risks. 

This workshop is critical now more than ever as it is designed to address all facets of procurement risk and provides advice to identify, access, avoid, transfer and mitigate  the supply chain challenges/risks in crisis times (e.g. Global Pandemic). How an outbreak of deadly disease happening at other part of the world would impact your supply chain and how you can protect your supply chain and address supply shortages and access to critical products and services. 

Professionals involved in Supply Chain Activities make decisions and inherit a variety of risks while executing procurement projects involving a large amount of dollars. Are you aware of those risks and should you be taking those risks? And how to provide value added services to your organization by effectively mitigating procurement risks.  Procurement professionals that understand risks, consequences and mitigation strategies are the leaders for supply chain.  Procurement professionals are tasked to achieve cost-savings and conduct an open, fair and transparent procurement process. Do you realize that systematic identification and risk mitigation strategies significantly increases your chances of achieving those cost savings targets and meeting the fairness obligations?

This workshop will show you how to achieve those targets and provide you with comprehensive understanding of different types of risks at each stage of the procurement process. It will provide you with risk mitigation strategies, case studies, checklists and best practices.

Target Audience:

This workshop is designed for wide-range of professionals involved in Supply Chain Activities (procuring goods, services, construction, consulting) within the private sector and public sector organizations (Municipal, Provincial and Federal government, Universities, Hospitals, School boards, Colleges and other government agencies) where they are directly or indirectly involved in procurement activities and influencing the procurement outcome.

The professionals including Project Managers, Evaluation Team members, Logistics professionals, Category Specialist, Procurement Analyst, Procurement Managers, Business Analysts, Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), Contract Managers, HR, IT, and Finance Professionals would greatly benefit  and gain confidence from this workshop where they would understand the procurement risks and gain knowledge around the best practices for managing those risks to improve the overall bottom line of their organization.

Learn More and Register Here

Non-member Price: $1,245 + HST

(Includes membership at Supply Chain Canada, Ont. Institute)

muniSERV members receive Discount of 20% – Use Code: MUNI20

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Capital Equipment Procurement and Contracting

Capital Equipment Procurement and Contracting

June 23 & 24 (9 am – 12.30 pm)

As a response to the COVID -19, we are conducting this professional development session online . We are fully cognizant of the difficult decisions you are making everyday, as supply chain professionals driving the Canadian economy during this extraordinary time. We applaud your commitment to continued education. 

This workshop will take place on the Zoom webinar platform. Please download Zoom here https://zoom.us/download

Capital Equipment Procurement and Contracting

Capital equipment procurement is often expensive, has a high level of complexity, may have limited suppliers and often has a technology component.  Whether you are buying industrial equipment or any heavy machinery, this session will provide you with strategies to deal with the current challenges of capital equipment procurement and contracting.  Recognizing that most entities have procurement processes in place, this session aims to enhance and facilitate your procurement process, not replace it.  

Attend the session and learn about topics such as multiple stakeholder interests, total cost of ownership, unique equipment requirements, post warranty support, and dealing effectively with global equipment vendors.

The session will address issues from the time the procurement need arises to contract completion, aiming to enhance and facilitate your current procurement process whether in the public or private sector.

This interactive session will include a review of practical take-away strategies, sample documentation, and exercises that will assist you in dealing with your day to day capital equipment procurement and contracting issues.

In light of emerging issues to the changing environment due to Covid-19, this course has been further updated to provide guidance in this regard. 

Learn More and Register Here.

Non-member Price: $1,295 + HST

(Includes membership at Supply Chain Canada, Ont. Institute) Receive 10 CPD points

muniSERV Members receive Discount of 20% – Use CODE: MUNI20

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Capital Equipment and Procurement

Capital Equipment Procurement and Contracting

June 16 & 17 (9 am – 12.30 pm)

June 23 & 24 (9 am – 12.30 pm)

Receive 10 CPD points

As a response to the COVID -19, we are conducting this professional development session online . We are fully cognizant of the difficult decisions you are making everyday, as supply chain professionals driving the Canadian economy during this extraordinary time. We applaud your commitment to continued education. 

This workshop will take place on the Zoom webinar platform. Please download Zoom here https://zoom.us/download

Capital Equipment Procurement and Contracting

Capital equipment procurement is often expensive, has a high level of complexity, may have limited suppliers and often has a technology component.  Whether you are buying industrial equipment or any heavy machinery, this session will provide you with strategies to deal with the current challenges of capital equipment procurement and contracting.  Recognizing that most entities have procurement processes in place, this session aims to enhance and facilitate your procurement process, not replace it.  

Attend the session and learn about topics such as multiple stakeholder interests, total cost of ownership, unique equipment requirements, post warranty support, and dealing effectively with global equipment vendors.

The session will address issues from the time the procurement need arises to contract completion, aiming to enhance and facilitate your current procurement process whether in the public or private sector.

This interactive session will include a review of practical take-away strategies, sample documentation, and exercises that will assist you in dealing with your day to day capital equipment procurement and contracting issues.

In light of emerging issues to the changing environment due to Covid-19, this course has been further updated to provide guidance in this regard. 

Learn More and Register Here.

Non-member Price: $1,295 + HST

(Includes membership at Supply Chain Canada, Ont. Institute) Receive 10 CPD points

muniSERV Members receive Discount of 20% – Use CODE: MUNI20

 

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Redesigning Streets for a Safer Tomorrow – Our COVID19 Temporary Normal

The month of May and early June has brought forth some innovative change – which some would see as long overdue. Toronto Mayor John Tory unveiled a plan to open more space for pedestrians and cyclists in congested areas as the province begins to reopen its doors in a post-COVID-19 world.

cyclists on Toronto city streets

The ActiveTO initiative set its aim on closing select major roads to car traffic in exchange for more room for walking and cycling. Additionally, the city plans to expand bicycle lane infrastructure and introduce traffic calming measures in local neighbourhoods to enhance the safety of pedestrians and cyclists. The city has now allocated 65 kilometres of quiet streets among 32 neighbourhoods. Some of us have already experienced these changes and felt their positive impact. 

It has become an inevitable realization for municipalities that residents are becoming eager to flock outdoors as the weather warms and the number of active COVID-19 cases gradually declines. The question now becomes not how cities can keep people inside, but how communities can strategically redesign their infrastructure to allow residents to get outside while continuing to safely obey social distancing measures. 

 

Each municipality will have unique challenges when reopening, and the proper planning of municipal infrastructure is critical. Although there is no cookie-cutter answer for the temporary redesign of city roads, there have already been successful initiatives taken by municipalities as they rethink their streets in anticipation of the return to regular life. 

 

Extending Bicycle Infrastructure

Cycling has become an increasingly popular mode of transportation for residents during the pandemic. It offers a chance for people to exercise and make local trips to essential locations, all while maintaining a safe social distance from other users. The World Health Organization has encouraged people to walk or cycle whenever possible. Experts boast that 30-60 minutes of physical activity per day can boost your immune system and help keep viruses at bay. Along with Toronto, many cities are moving towards implementing additional cycling infrastructure during this time. 

In Canada, Vancouver, Calgary, and Winnipeg have each allocated over 15 kilometres of additional bike lanes throughout their neighbourhoods since the beginning of the pandemic. In Philadelphia, cycling trips have increased by more than 150% and public bike-share programs across North America are experiencing a steep increase in users over the past month. People who usually rely on public transportation are finding cycling to be a safer alternative that allows them to avoid crowded buses and subways.

 

Expanding Sidewalks 

With the decrease in vehicle traffic as a result of the closure of many businesses and services, cities have opted to provide temporary walkways extending onto streets to allow residents to maintain an appropriate distance from one another. Montreal’s Plateau Mont-Royal borough has introduced family and active streets – a campaign that closes select local streets to through traffic to make room for pedestrians to roam freely. New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio recently announced the opening of 40 miles worth of open streets throughout May. 

 

garbage can

Smaller cities have also been quick to answer the call to reorganize their communities. Kitchener has installed temporary bollards to extend sidewalks along the city’s main street to allow for more room for physical distancing. Drummondville has closed its Curé-Marchand bridge to all motorized vehicles, and St. Johns has decided to widen the sidewalks of high-volume streets to open up more space for pedestrians and cyclists.

One-Way Sidewalks, Eliminating Beg Buttons, and More

Aside from the large-scale infrastructure adjustments that are occurring, some cities are looking towards more creative solutions to help curb the community spread of the COVID-19 virus. Sections of sidewalk along Highbury Avenue in London, Ontario have been converted into one-way walkways where it has been difficult to maintain a 2-meter buffer from others.

walking on streets in London Ontario

Places such as Calgary, Edmonton, and Hamilton have eliminated beg buttons at crosswalks and intersections. These cities have completely automated their signal cycles at intersections so that pedestrians can avoid pressing frequently touched buttons if they want to cross a street. Places like Boston, Portland, and New York City are offering free bike-share memberships for health care workers and other essential labourers. Additionally, Calgary is choosing to not advertise streets where they have extended sidewalks and bicycle lanes to not attract crowds in these areas. 

 

Take Action

The initial fear that creating more space for alternative forms of transportation would create problems of overcrowding seems to have subsided among a majority of city officials. As cities worldwide begin to roll-out post-COVID-19 mobility plans, it is undeniable that more residents will be outside for essential trips and exercise. Instead of eliminating space for movement, cities must restructure themselves to allocate enough space for its residents to move freely and safely.

As we see staged reopening within Ontario, consider reimagining your urban spaces, shared spaces and hot spots within your neighbourhoods. Offering residents the chance to get involved in the conversation whether it be through social media, online public platforms, or email can encourage those measures in place, are enjoyed and followed.  

 

Trans-Plan is committed to helping aid your community in its gradual reopening. Our COVID-19 Temporary Planning Services integrate professional engineering expertise and proprietary modeling capability to assist in providing innovative services for disaster-ready plans. We offer customized redesign plans for temporary conditions.

 

Written By: Trans-Plan team member – Ryan McClelland

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