Public Tender Openings – Still Relevant?

The Procurement Drop-In – Monthly Call-In Show

Join us for an interactive 30-40 minute presentation on relevant topics in by experts who work in the field of municipal procurement. Stick around after each session to get answers to your burning questions!

Complementary Webinar – Session #6 – Public Tender Openings – Still Relevant?

Why is it that most municipalities are still opening bids in public when other public tender openings are not? Join us for this interactive session on whether this practice is still relevant in an age of COVID and international trade agreements.

What You’ll Learn: What public openings are still relevant today vs. not and reasons to reconsider your approach.

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This is one of six (6) complimentary training sessions on municipal procurement.  Be sure to check out the others here.

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Managing Conflicts: When Friends and Neighbours are your Contactors

The Procurement Drop-In – Monthly Call-In Show

Join us for an interactive 30-40 minute presentation on relevant topics in by experts who work in the field of municipal procurement. Stick around after each session to get answers to your burning questions!

Complimentary Training Session #5 – Managing Conflicts: When Friends and Neighbours are your Contactors

It’s a problem most municipalities face at one time or another – municipal staff purchasing goods and services from friends and family.  This practice can lead to public mistrust and erode value for money in procurement. This session will provide tips and tricks for managing these situations.

What You’ll Learn:  Tips and tricks for managing conflicts of interest in procurement.

Register here

This is one of six (6) complimentary training sessions on municipal procurement.  Be sure to check out the others here.

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How to Deal with Unhappy Bidders

The Procurement Drop-In – Monthly Call-In Show

Join us for an interactive 30-40 minute presentation on relevant topics in by experts who work in the field of municipal procurement. Stick around after each session to get answers to your burning questions!

Complementary Session # 4 – How to Deal with Unhappy Bidders

The CFTA and CETA have provided unhappy suppliers with new legal rights and remedies including a right to a debrief and new avenues of complaint.  We’ll look at the do’s and don’ts of handling bidder complaints.

What You’ll Learn: Why you should offer debriefings and tips on how to effectively manage complaints to head off future litigation.

Register here

This is one of six (6) complimentary training sessions on municipal procurement.  Be sure to check out the others here.

 

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Making Procurement Work in Your Small Municipality

The Procurement Drop-In – Monthly Call-In Show

Join us for an interactive 30-40 minute presentation on relevant topics in by experts who work in the field of municipal procurement. Stick around after each session to get answers to your burning questions!

Complementary Online Training – Session #3 – Making Procurement Work in Your Small Municipality

Doing procurement without procurement staff? This session is designed for you. In this session we review a checklist of items that small municipalities should have in place to operate a do-it-yourself procurement model while managing legal, operational and reputational risks associated with procurement.  

What You’ll Learn: Building a governance framework that facilitates a DIY model for procurement.

Register here

This is one of six (6) complimentary training sessions on municipal procurement.  Be sure to check out the others here.

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Finding Efficiencies in Procurement

The Procurement Drop-In – Monthly Call-In Show

Join us for an interactive 30-40 minute presentation on relevant topics in by experts who work in the field of municipal procurement. Stick around after each session to get answers to your burning questions!

Complementary Training Session #2 – Finding Efficiencies in Procurement

Done poorly, procurement can be a time and resource consuming activity. This session will provide low-lying fruit strategies to streamline procurement efforts while still ensuring compliance.   

What You’ll Learn: Common strategies used to streamline procurement and lower transaction costs.

Register here

This is one of six (6) complimentary training sessions on municipal procurement.  Be sure to check out the others here.

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Everything You Need to Know about Municipal Procurement in 30 Minutes

The Procurement Drop-In – Monthly Call-In Show

Join us for an interactive 30-40 minute presentation on relevant topics in by experts who work in the field of municipal procurement. Stick around after each session to get answers to your burning questions!

Complementary Training Session #1 – Everything You Need to Know about Municipal Procurement in 30 Minutes

A 30-minutes overview of all you need to know about municipal procurement law, including key common law principles and the main trade agreements and where the risks lie for municipalities.

What You’ll Learn: Key principles of municipal procurement law and common pitfalls to avoid!

Register here.

Note:  This is a series of six (6) complementary training sessions on municipal procurement. Be sure to check out the others here.

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Customer Service Excellence – Maximizing Efficiency and Improving Customer Service

AccessE11 Citizen Issue ManagementMunicipal 311 Software Designed for Local Government

Is your municipality looking for ways to improve your complaint and service request management? Do you want to better understand the issues citizens are bringing to your municipality? Would you like valuable reports for your department heads and council? How about collaborating with staff on the issues they are managing? Want to streamline services requests and effectively manage them?

AccessE11 is a cloud-based, easy-to-use software solution to assist municipalities in better managing, tracking and reporting citizen inquiries, issues and complaints impacting your community.

Register for our January Webinar to learn about all of this and more!

January 19th 12pm – 1pm EST

Presented in Partnership with The Ontario Municipal Leadership Institute

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Code Enforcement with AccessE11

The mandate of municipal government is to provide access to civic amenities and to ensure that residents follow the local laws and ordinances adopted by City Council.

In general, there are operating processes in place to monitor and enforce these municipal codes. However, it is often the residents themselves that witness and report code violations, at which point the municipality’s responsibility is to initiate an investigation and resolve the situation. When this occurs, there are additional complexities involved, with many municipalities struggling to track and meet their service targets to address citizen-initiated complaints. Any departments responsible for code enforcement must triage citizen complaints across a diverse range of property maintenance, parking, noise, nuisance and other issues. Then, activities must be coordinated with officers in the field, all actions tracked, and any documents consolidated until compliance is reached.

Using the AccessE11 service request management platform, multiple municipalities have streamlined and automated their code enforcement approach, making it effortless for staff to capture citizen complaints, assign the right team, resolve the underlying issues, institute centralized tracking and record keeping, and easily report on issues individually or on an aggregated basis.

Capturing Code Issues

Increasingly, residents expect to be able to interact with their municipality in the same way they do private-sector organizations via multiple channels, and this applies equally to code enforcement.

In light of this, AccessE11 has created a platform that allows citizens to report their concerns online, by email, and using integrated mobile apps. Categorization of each violation by category (permit issue, graffiti, trash & debris, noise etc.) is completely flexible, and geolocation of the issue and inclusion of pictures/other details is simple.

Once reported, the software automatically creates a case to track the issue, acknowledges receipt to the citizen, sets follow-up and due dates, and routes the case to a specific staff member. Moreover, it immediately makes the information available in configurable dashboards, embedded maps and reports to provide a centralized, cohesive view of all past and ongoing code enforcement activities.

Processing Citizen Issues

Inspections are an integral part of the resolution process and, to that end, code enforcement officers are provided with an up to date and prioritized view of the complaints they need to follow-up with the AccessE11 mobile app for staff. Depending on whether or not a violation is observed, an officer on location can close the case immediately, or further document it with corrective actions and a date for a follow-up inspection if required.

Some municipalities also use code sweeps within delimited geographical areas as a proactive means of enhancing the safety, cleanliness and conditions of a neighbourhood. In this scenario, officers can create cases for tracking purposes directly using the mobile app. All relevant information is seamlessly and centrally logged with no need for the officer to visit the municipal office simply to enter data.

From the time an issue is reported through to closure, departmental managers, assigned staff and, to an appropriate extent, the reporting citizen are kept informed with automated, real-time notifications. Code enforcement teams are able to work seamlessly and avoid crossed wires. The reporting citizen can also get updates on their concern at any time by visiting AccessE11’s citizen-facing portal.

Operational Effectiveness

Citizens demand services from municipalities, but they also expect them to use tax dollars wisely. Authorities have a duty to avoid waste wherever possible and act in the public interest.

To that end, they need systems that allow them to make informed decisions and measure the success of their activities. AccessE11’s platform allows code enforcement departments to visualize and report on valuable data, letting them make evidence-based decisions. Managers can prioritize tasks, collect data on current and historic trends, measure against service targets, and gauge the effectiveness of the municipality’s response to issues. This data-driven approach enables managers to get a better handle on the overall efficacy of their teams, as well as the productivity of individual members.

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Ontario State of Emergency Returns – What You Need to Know

Municipal Employer Update – State of Emergency Returns

Further to Premier Ford’s announcement January 12th, the Province is returning to a State of Emergency, effective Thursday, January 14th. Though public health measures and restrictions have been in place throughout the pandemic, Ontario has not been in a State of Emergency since July 24, 2020.

 

We note below only the changes that will come into place Thursday (all current Grey Zone lockdown measures remain in effect as now).  These measures will continue until at least February 11, 2021: 

  1. Employers must ensure that employees who can complete their work from home do so.  Employees are not to attend work unless the nature of their work requires them to be on-site at the workplace (for example manufacturers, retailers offering curbside pick-up etc.)
  2. For employees that must attend work, face masks are mandatory in all workplaces even in instances where physical distancing can be maintained.  Masks must be worn outdoors if the workplace does not allow for 2m (6’) of distancing.
  3. Outdoor gatherings are reduced from a maximum of 10 people to 5 people.
  4. Schools will remain closed until February 10 in Windsor, Toronto, Peel, York and Hamilton regions.
  5. Previously announced school re-openings remain as scheduled until further notice.
  6. Daycares remain open to non-school age children.
  7. Retailer and restaurants may provide services as they do now but may only remain open from 7am to 8pm (liquor, beer stores, 9am to 8pm).  Reduced capacity restrictions are being applied to big box stores.
  8. The 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. restriction does not apply to grocery stores, pharmacies and health care facilities.
  9. Car dealers may remain open by appointment only (as now) but only between 7am and 8pm.
  10. Non-essential construction is restricted, including below-grade construction, except for surveying.

Importantly, Ontario has not imposed a general curfew on citizens (as Quebec elected to do by forbidding citizens from being outside their home after 8pm without an essential reason).



As always, if you have questions or need assistance, please contact our offices anytime (while we are working virtually, emails and phones are being monitored at all times).  New developments are expected and we will continue to keep you updated.



SHRP LIMITED

925-550 Skyway Drive (Airport Road)

Peterborough,  Ontario  K9J 0E7

705-400-714 | [email protected]

www.savinohrp.ca | www.hrlive.ca

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Covid-19 Increases HungerCount

 

The Covid-19 economy has reduced quality of life for many impacted by the pandemic. Individuals struggling with food security and mental health will increase. Innovative digital solutions can help collect data and apply data science to provide guidance on how best to manage the crisis with the resources in your community using proactive strategies that cost less and deliver better outcomes.

The Institute for Smarter Government can show you how.

Food Banks Canada monitors hunger across Canada each year with data collected from 4,934 organizations. There were over 1 million visits to Canadian foodbanks in 2019 delivering over 5.5 million meals. This was an increase of 47% over 2018. The pandemic will accelerate visits to the foodbank in 2020 and 2021 with an increase in mental health concerns at the same time.

In 2019, 57% of those requiring help with food were on social assistance, 48% came from a single adult household. One in eight were unemployed.

When Food Banks Canada annual survey HungerCount 2019 asked agencies what their clients’ main reason was for accessing a food bank, clients shared that their social assistance or benefits were too low. They had low or delayed wages. Some had lost their job and were unemployed or did not have enough hours. These four areas of concern accounted for 80% of those individuals requiring assistance from a food bank.

That was in 2019. With Covid in 2020 and now 2021, the economy will hit those living on the edge the hardest. Many families and single adults have less household income. Unemployment and reduced hours with lower pay will greatly accelerate the number of single adults and families arriving at the food bank in 2020/2021.

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Foodbanks HungerCount 2019

There are over 1.1 million Canadians receiving welfare and over 2 million if you include those with disabilities and mental health issues. The Canada Community Health Survey shows food insecurity has a statistically significant relationship with mental health variables.

The connection between food insecurity and mental health is greater with single person households now accounting for 48% of all households served. One in three of the single adults lives in poverty. Since 2016, seniors over 65 mostly with fixed incomes requiring an expansive array of expensive medications have increased visits to the food bank by nearly 30%.

Close to one in five single adults experiences food insecurity and many of those need support from a food bank to make ends meet. Many within this group have mental health issues that are exacerbated by poverty and low income. Many have mental health issues that go untreated for lack of supports available to them, are stuck in a cycle of inadequate social assistance or disability-related supports, or have lost a job and have nowhere to turn for new training and education programs to re-enter the workforce.

When the rent and wage subsidies transition back to the pre-covid economy, the need for food bank support will increase. Mental health and a range of other human service issues will surge.

Food Banks Canada will conduct research March 2021, across the nation to collect data from each community. Short term solutions will help address the immediate need for food while longer term solutions will focus on policy and try to address the question why. #BellLetsTalk offers some great Covid 19 resources to help everyone get through this together.

Canada is now seeing over 8,000 new case of the coronavirus each day. This is four times the rate when the pandemic started in 2020. Vaccines will help reduce transmission. This will take time.

Each community needs to understand how best to serve their population with the resources at hand. Innovative digital solutions can help begin collecting data in a client centric manner that makes it easier to apply analytics and create prescriptive programs that deliver better outcomes for less.

The Canada Healthy Communities Initiative makes it possible for every community to apply for Infrastructure Canada funding starting January 2021.

Be smart and get ahead of the Covid crisis. #Buildbackbetter Find out how to submit your proposal for funding at February webinar. Details will be posted shortly.

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